The Mystery of The "Black Dog" of The Bridgewater Triangle




In the spring of 1976, the town of Abington went into lockdown mode when a huge throat-eating, "bullet-proof" dog mysteriously appeared in a rural residential area surrounded by over 100-acres of dense swamp. Fear rippled through the south shore of Boston after word got out the killer dog had ripped the throats out of two ponies. The dog had intelligently chased the animals--who had been tethered to trees--around and around until the they were tied helpless, unable to escape the teeth of the horrid beast. When locals read the news that the beast had evaded two different bullets fired by two seperate town officials, all out panic ensued. This event was documented in the chapter on the Bridgewater Triangle in Loren Coleman's "Mysterious America" and has gone down in the Bridgewater Triangle legend books as the "The Black Dog of Abington."

A Gruesome Discovery: Two Ponies Throats Ripped Out By Dog Reportedly As "Large as the Dead Ponies" 


At 7 a.m. on the morning of April 30, 1976,  a sleeping Philip Kane--an Abington firefighter-- was awoken by his 12-year old daughter. Carole Kane had just returned from the backyard in horror. That morning, no doubt, Carole fully expected to find her two ponies, Joe Joe and Peek-A-Boo, hungry as usual, anticipating their morning feed. Instead, something was feeding on them. It was a dog. It was enormous. And it was covered in blood.

After Carole woke him, Philip Kane grabbed a baseball bat and raced out the back door. "Half awake and half dressed, Kane stumbled outside and was startled to see the two ponies, their halters in a tangle, lying on their sides. Their throats had been ripped out. The dog, a large black and brown animal, perhaps a German shepherd and half doberman, was hovering over one of the carcasses eating. The dog looked huge to Kane. Perhaps it was his own fright, he said later, which made the animal appear as large as the dead ponies themselves," The Boston Globe reported. "Kane chased the dog away, first with a baseball bat, and then, when it returned, with a pistol shot that missed. The animal ran into the adjoining thicket and swamps."

The Dog Is Tracked Down By Police, Within Target Range, Cop Shoots But Misses 


The next day, May 1, 1976 would be the last time the dog would be seen. Abington police officer Frank Curran followed a legitimate lead to the Summer Street railroad tracks. There, Curran saw the dog slowly walking along the tracks. The animal was stained with blood. Officer Curran fired at the dog. It was a clean shot. The shot missed its large and slow target for the second time in two days.


"The last time the dog was presumed seen was last Saturday, Frank Curran fired a shot at it, but missed. "It didn't even run, Curran said. it merely turned around and walked in the other direction."

Panic Spreads Throughout The South Shore


"Word spread. The search and fear began. Residents called the police saying they had seen the animal crossing the street, at the dump, at one local ice cream stand, from one end of town to another. One man said he saw the dog, his mouth still dripping with blood, in the woods behind his apartment complex."

Over the next few days, the Abington Police Department would be deluged with over 1,000 phone calls from concerned citizens and witnesses who reported they had seen the large dog. Abington school children would be escorted to their buses by police armed with rifles.

"Kane became an instant expert on the dog. He was called to look at every dog that might fit the description. In one week, he said, he went to Weymouth three times, Brockton twice and Whitman once. None of the dogs was the one."


In Conclusion: My Two Cents


The dog was first seen on one end of Summer Street, and last seen on the other. And within one day. It is hard to believe that two separate town officials could miss such a large and reportedly slow moving target. How those bullets didn't touch the beast and where it disappeared to are the two biggest mysteries of this very true legend.
Summer Street railroad tracks, Abington. Site of where officer Frank Curran
last witnessed the killer dog who disappeared just as mysteriously as it had
appeared the day before. It was here that Curran would fire the second shot that
 would miss the large and slow moving target in close to 24 hours. Two shots
fired by two seperate shooters.

Efforts have been made to speak to Frank Curran, but the closest I have come was a quick Q and A with a close family member, who could only confirm that it did in fact happen. And that he remembered Curran telling him that the dog was covered in blood when he saw him on the tracks. That detail was not reported in newspapers. Frank Curran doesn't speak of the incident. Only one shot fired by him was reported in the newspapers. Only one shot. This doesn't make a lot of sense.

What does make sense is that Curran shot at the animal many times and all bullets inexplicably missed. And that dog possibly disappeared in front of his eyes. That would certainly keep someone from ever wanting to talk about it again. I know it would be for me. And I also know that if there was a killer dog on the loose in my town and I was a cop...and I had tracked it to some railroad tracks, I wouldn't have shot at it just once. Especially if the target didn't even run; Curran reported it walked away slowly down the tracks. If this is true, then why didn't he chase it? Call other officers to cover the train tracks (a straight line)? Try shooting at it again? There is more to this story than we will ever know, I suspect. Mysterious indeed. And certainly deserving of legendary status.