Bigfoot & the Purple Laser Beam






By Kristen Good


John Stanga is in his mid-fifties now and far away from the Bridgewater Triangle, having settled in North Carolina as an adult. But not a day goes by where Stanga does not think of most bizarre night of his life, when he and childhood friend witnessed a double whammy of a Class A Bigfoot sighting followed by a strange purple beam that shot down from the sky in South Weymouth. (A location about three miles from the northern tip of the area delineated as "The Bridgewater Triangle.")


John Stanga contacted me in 2011 with the following account:


“I want to relay this story about, for the lack of a better term, “Bigfoot” sighting me and my best friend Dave had in September 1972 in South Weymouth, Massachusetts. The date was Friday, Sept. 29, 1972 at about 7:30 pm. Dave and I were 14 years old at the time and had known each other since 1st grade. What happened that night is as follows:


Dave’s family just moved to a new neighborhood they were building behind my street (Courier Street). His family lived in my neighborhood before that. That’s how we knew each other for so long. We were walking around his street (Lintric Drive) which is a loop. We all hung up there because there weren’t many houses up there yet, especially on the farm side of his development and we went to school with other kids up there. We happened to run into his 15-year old sister, who was babysitting one of the kids who lived there. Dave’s sister wanted to go over to the old farm field and smoke a cigarette. The incident happened  at the old farm field. The field was part of a large horse farm, but not kept up. The grass probably stood three-feet high. The field was between my street, a new elementary school (Union Street Elementary School), and Lintric Drive. There was a pond in the field to one corner and woods on three sides. Other fields, heavier woods, swamps, and creeks went on for quite a distance plus there was a sandpit and the Old Swamp River out in those woods. Dave’s neighborhood was built over the dirt access road that used to be the right of way to the farm. Most of it was still there in 1972.


We walked over to the farm field using the old dirt road.


Because of the lights around the school, the field was quite brightly lit once your eyes became accustomed to the available light.  The vegetation between the school and the field was low enough at that time to allow a lot of light into the field. We stood in a circle under one of the two large trees that stood on the field. I stood facing Dave, with the school to my left. Dave was busy talking to his sister when I heard or sensed something was with us in the field and at the same time it caught my eye. It was to the left of me, no more than 30 to 50 feet away!  It was a large, hairy creature walking parallel to the school to my left. It kind of looked like a gorilla, but was huge. I remember it had huge shoulders and head. The shoulders looked to me like they were six to eight feet off the ground. The head just went into them, maybe with a slightly conical shape, with no real neck to speak of. Its arms were quite long and the legs short. It looked hairy, but was really just a dark shape against the lights of the school.


It crept in short movements. By that I mean it put its arms out, hands down on the ground, and then moved its back legs forward about the same distance...  I saw it do this a few times.  I never saw it walk upright. Although the creature was silhouetted in the light, I could tell it was watching us. I believe it did not want us to see it and was trying to move quietly through the grass on the edge of the field. It did not make any sounds. It had large shoulders, no neck and a large head. The body was heavily built. The head profile looked like the “Bigfoot” in the 1967 Patterson film when it turned and looked at them as it walked away. Needless to say I must have looked freaked out and turn to look at Dave who also looked the same. I said to him,” do you see that” and he said “yeah”. We just started to run away up the dirt road by to his neighborhood.  We didn’t even say why we were running to his sister. Naturally she and the kid ran when we did. Once we got safely back to Lintric Drive and stopped running Dave’s sister asked why we ran. When we told her, she called us a couple of jerks and though we were trying to just scare her. She went back to the house she was babysitting at and Dave and I hung out in front of a house that was under construction that bordered the field.


There was a small strip of woods between the house and the field. It was right in front of the sighting spot. We wanted to go back and see if the creature was still there, but were too afraid. We heard some noise, wood banging or wood being knocked around at the house under construction and decided that it was in our best interest to leave the area and see if we could find some of our other friends to tell them what we saw and maybe to go back there "in force". As we were walking back to a house where our other friends usually were hanging out at, things got weirder if you can believe it.


After walking maybe a couple of hundred down Lintric Drive, the second strange thing happened that night. We had a beam or a ray shoot in front of us. It was higher than the tree tops, but went right across our path. It looked like a black light stretched across the sky because it was purple. It was bright but did not illuminate anything. It was almost like it was a solid rod of purple light. It actually hummed and had a feeling of power to it. Very strange!


It lasted only a second or two, but truly shocked us.  I’d say it was like 6” in diameter and shot across the sky like a laser beam. We lived less than a mile from the South Weymouth Naval Air Station which was active at the time. I would say the beam would have to cross over the air base and maybe even came from it.  I lived around that base for over 30 years and never saw any beams come from the base before or after that event. I never saw anything like the beam or the creature again. We were always in those woods and fields AT ALL HOURS after that and never saw anything else strange or unexplained ever again.


Unfortunately the farm field, woods, and sandpits are gone, all developed, although the field remains as a golf course. I cannot say if the creature and the light beam were related, but they happened within 10 minutes or less of each other. Dave and I always felt the creature was not of the world and the beam had something to do with it.  That is only our speculation though. There has not been one day in my life that I have not thought about that night. It is probably good to note that Dave and I did not take drugs or drink alcohol and were completely straight at the time of the incident. Of course, most people never believed us and still don’t. I swear that all of the above is true to my best recollection.”


Stanga’s incredible story is intriguing on many levels. Weymouth borders the Bridgewater Triangle apex town of Abington to the north. Lintric Drive is a mere three and a half miles from Abington. Weymouth--and many other towns surrounding the delineated map of the Bridgewater Triangle--could certainly qualify as inclusion as part of southeastern Massachusetts’ “Bridgewater Triangle,” based on bizarre and unexplained activity,  archaeological mysteries,  and Native American sacred grounds.


Many UFOs have been reported seen whizzing through the skies over Massachusetts’ south shore over the years and many of those sightings have been reported by local newspapers. The published UFO sighting that we are interested in right now though, is the one published in July of 1972. The article appeared in The Boston Globe with the headline,  “Up In the Sky: Not a Bird, not a plane. Not superman either--it’s a UFO” on July 5, 1972--just two months before John Stanga’s encounter.


On the evening of July 3, 1972  residents all around the south shore witnessed a large shiny object in the sky.The Weymouth Naval Base received numerous calls by alarmed witnesses seeking answers about what the object might have been. But Weymouth Naval Base could provide no answer to appease their fear and curiosity.


“South Shore residents were still talking excitedly at Fourth of July barbecues and cocktail parties about a weird, unidentified flying object they saw Monday in the evening sky. ..it was apparently the first mass UFO sighting since a rash of flying saucers appeared over New England back in 1966.


Paul Kamp, 45, of Dog Lane road, Marshfield, was among the first to see whatever it was.


I looked up and saw it too--a triangular shaped object that looked like one big wing,” he said. “It was translucent and I thought I could see blue sky through it, but its edges were white and well defined...it remained in sight for 45 minutes  and then disappeared in cloud cover.”


Kamp said about 25 of his neighbors could verify they saw what he saw.


He and other South Shore residents reported the UFO sighting to the South Shore Weymouth Naval Air Station.”


“All I can say is we received maybe 15 calls between 8 and 10 p.m., about a silvery, triangular transparent object moving west,” said a duty  officer at the air station. “We don’t know what it was.

All rights reserved. Copyright, 2017, Kristen Good
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News Crew Mystified By Equipment Malfunctions While Touring Bridgewater Triangle Hot Spots

When Fox25 reporter Melissa Mahan contacted me last month to ask me to take her and the film crew out to some of the hotspots of the Bridgewater Triangle, I was happy to oblige. It sounded like an adventure...and an adventure it certainly turned out to be.  On August 7, 2014, Fox 25 featured the Bridgewater Triangle on a Zip Trip to Bridgewater. (Fox25's Zip Trips are live broadcasts from a various featured Massachusetts towns.) Fox25 filmed the town tour of Bridgewater on August 4. I met the crew near Bridgewater State University and we set off for our first location. And that's when the trouble began.The shot should have been easy: Fox 25 reporter Melissa Mahan driving into dirt parking spot in the Mazda Zip Trip Car, stopping, opening the door and introducing herself to me.  But the shot wasn't easy. We had to do at five takes due to "technical difficulties."

The microphones had failed on camera. Jennifer, the camera woman, kept trying different microphones and to her bewilderment, those all failed too. Finally, she took out an old fashioned microphone, shrugged her shoulders and said, "This is how we do it old school ." The crew was half laughing, half genuinely spooked. I was the only one NOT surprised. After all, we were in a hot spot of the Bridgewater Triangle and camera malfunctions, battery drains and equipment failure isn't an UNUSUAL occurrence here.

The last time I had been to Styles & Hart Conservation area--the site of an infamous Bigfoot encounter in 1978--I found a dead bird hanging from a tree, a large ring of quartz stones and a 1950's Pepsi bottle sticking straight up out of the ground (it was worth $75!)  It would take a lot to surprise me.
Next we all caravaned back into our cars and headed to our next location on the other side of Bridgewater, to the town line of Raynham. Lake Nippenicket is a body of water that has had so many tragedies over the years, swimming has been banned in this lake that has an average depth of a mere three feet. I was taking them to one of THE heaviest energy spots in the whole of this bizarre area called the Bridgewater Triangle, so what happened next did not surprise me either. Heading down a long dirt road into the infamous Hockomock Swamp, Jennifer's Go Pro camera started to malfunction. She said it "just went nuts" and started flashing and going static. Again...I was not surprised.

When the Zip Trip episode aired, I was FINALLY surprised. They used all that happened with their equipment malfunctions for the piece. I thought that was daring and I loved it. Here is a clip from the Fox 25 Zip Trip visit to the Bridgewater Triangle and my little adventure with Melissa Mahan.




To see the whole Zip Trip Segment of the Bridgewater Town Tour, click here.

Melissa and I at the shores of Bridgewater Triangle hotspot, 
Lake Nippenicket,
known to locals as simply, "The Nip."




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Troubled Waters: The Bridgewater Triangle's Infamous Lake Nippenicket


Lake Nippenicket ( or “The Nip” for short) is 354-acres of extreme high strangeness. The Nip straddles Bridgewater and Raynham, and is located on the boundary line of Plymouth and Bristol counties. Cryptic creatures, spectral fires, Native American ghosts, UFOs and other unusual sightings have all been seen here at Lake Nip, a body of water that holds a mysterious history of accidents and drownings. For decades, this lake has held the reputation of stealing the lives people too young to die. With an average depth of a mere three feet—and just six feet at its deepest point—The Nip’s  morbid history of drowning certainly is one of
The Nip’s biggest mysteries.

 It seems as though Lake Nippenicket is a a place where anything can happen. The skies over The Nip are a favorite hangout for UFOs, and those same strange skies over the lake have rained frogs on at least on
Alien pods? No, just a bryazoan, a rare organism that  survived the ice age
which made an appearance in Lake Nip in the summer of 2012.
occasion.  In the 1920s, one local paper reported that Lake Nippenicket had snakes so large, they were eating the trout. In the summer of 2012, huge alien-looking blobs mysteriously invaded the dark waters of Lake Nippenickett. Some as large as four feet,  the strange jellyfish-looking organisms turned out to be a strange and little known about species that is millions of years old, having survived the ice age called Bryazoans. Bryazoans are typically found in the Arctic Ocean, but this particular breed--the Phylactomlaemata-- is found in freshwater. With tentacles, a mouth and reproductive organs, these creatures are one of Earth’s most bizarre creatures. That they would make an appearance here at the Nip is not that much a stretch of the imagination.

Black magic is said to be conducted on the islands of The Nip and local legend has it that the island are very sacred Indian burial grounds. Jack Kelley knows firsthand that crazy stuff goes on the islands. Growing up on the lake, Kelley has seen plenty of bizarre activity in his lifetime. “One time I rowed out to the small island and there we found evidence of voodoo. We found a weird doll with a seashell necklace and real human hair. It was real detailed. I touched it and wished I hadn’t. I felt weird for weeks until I went back. It was gone. All the ritual sites were gone.”

On the large island, Kelley also had many strange experiences, including this one:“One time a friend and I camped out on the island there in The Nip. Out of nowhere my friend started feeling suicidal. He was like “blank.” He started walking into water and tried to drown himself. Something had taken over his body and he was blank. Lifeless.”

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Comfort Bridge & The Solitude Stone


The Solitude Stone lay undiscovered for 80 years...until a local girl went missing after one fateful canoe trip in West Bridgewater in the summer of 1916. If Evelyn Packard hadn't mysteriously died, her body not found for days, the Solitude Stone might never had been discovered at all.

1916. A missing girl vanishes from a canoe on the Town River in West Bridgewater within a half hour after she rents her canoe. The canoe is found shortly after with no clues as to her
whereabouts. Her coat and a pillow are found inside the canoe "bone dry."

One headline read: "Doctors Fear Girl is Crazed in Hockomock Swamp." After combing the woods for days and finding no clues as to her whereabouts, foul play is suspected. During one of grueling searches of the woods of the swamp, a local reporter decides to take a break and sits down  on nearby Comfort Bridge, a bridge that at the time was made out of three immense ancient stones. Up until of August of 1916, no one had noticed that there was something very special about this particular stone. Hidden under 80 years of dirt and moss, was the stone that would become known as the "Solitude Stone." It would take some time to uncover the mysterious author of the words inscribed on it. And that person would turn out to be the leading Egyptologist of the day, called upon worldwide to decipher hieroglyphics. He wrote the book "The Temple of Solomon" and followed the teachings of an occultist mystic.

Only in the Bridgewater Triangle, right?

The Solitude Stone might possibly be the BIGGEST clue in the mystery of the Bridgewater Triangle.
Let me start at the beginning. “Pretty” Evelyn Packard--as local papers called her--had taken the trolley from her Brockton home to The Americanage Club on South Street on August 4, 1916. There on one beautiful, sunny Wednesday morning, she rented a canoe and began a journey to which she would never return. Soon after Packard began her paddle “into oblivion” down Town River, two local boys found her canoe floating empty in a lagoon. The authorities were stunned. If she had fallen into the water from her canoe, surely there would be water on the interior to indicate a splash. But there was none. The canoe was bone dry. Area doctors speculated that Packard had wandered into Hockomock Swamp and had become “crazed by her experiences.” The townspeople dragged the river, despite the suspicion that the girl was lost in the swamp, but produced no evidence to solve the mystery of her disappearance. The day after Packard disappeared, one local newspaper reported, “The mystery remains as deep as ever and that there remains one explanation: That the young woman was the victim of foul play. Miss Packard’s own family scout the theory of her being enticed into one of the several cottages along the river bank and being held prisoner. In other words, the disappearance of the really beautiful and shapely 27-year old Brockton girl is as profound a mystery tonight as it was on Wednesday afternoon, when the canvas-covered canoe, which had been hired earlier in the day at the Americanage Canoe Club, was found drifting, right side up, and with the interior and the contests as dry as a chip, by two boys.”

Packard's body was found under Skim Milk Bridge (two bridges down the river from Comfort on the Town River) three days after she first went missing. During the search for her body, while searchers were still combing the river, a local newspaper reporter found something curious in the woods. A peculiar stone with an inscription on it...in the middle of nowhere. 1900s Bridgewater Historian Edgar Howard wrote of the incident: "While sitting upon the bridge, resting after a day of arduous searching for the girl, the writer’s attention was arrested by an inscription chiseled upon the flat stone forming the south side of the bridge. The stone is of an oblong shape and perhaps five or six feet across. Curiosity was aroused and an attempt was made to decipher the ancient inscription, which comprised of six lines extending across the face of the stone, and which had been almost been obliterated by time and the elements, and it was only by clearing away the tangled vines and filling the letters."


Poem Inscribed on the Solitude Stone:

All ye, who in future days,
Walk by Nunckatessett stream
Love not him who hummed his lay
Cheerful to the parting beam,
But the Beauty that he wooed.

Emmanual Swedonborg
As to who the author and inscriber of the solitude stone was, it was a mystery. Why would someone take the time to inscribe these words onto a stone where no one would find it? Edgar Howard made it his mission to discover who the poet and inscriber were who had carved the lines into to the ancient rock. “The beauty of the scene may well have inspired the lines. To the south stretches Eagles Nest Meadows toward the Hockomock, with the winding Nunckatessett and the woods beyond. At the bridge the stream makes a sharp turn to the right before it reaches the Pine Hill ridge, crowned by whispering pines, flowing under the old bridge, with its riot of vines and almost hiding it from view.” 

It was Howard who figured out it was Timothy Otis Paine who left his mark in the solitude of the woods so long ago. REVEREND Timothy Otis Paine. Reverend Timothy Otis Paine of the New Church of Jeruselum. Never heard of The New Church? It is a religion based on Christianity and the teachings of the occultist Emanuel Swedenborg and largely based on principles of the Age of Aquarius. From Swedonborg's teachings came the Rite of Swedonborg or the Swedonborg Rite, a fraternity that paralled freemasonry.


"A detailed discussion of those ideas, and of Swedenborgian theology in general is beyond the scope of this paper but certain aspects must be noted in order to make sense of the Swedenborgian Rite. For Swedenborg the physical world is the result of spiritual causes, and the laws of nature are reflections of spiritual laws; thus objects and even the material world are images of their spiritual counterparts. This is his doctrine of 'correspondences'. From this derives the other notion that concerns us: the idea behind the literal, historical meaning of the scriptures is an inner, spiritual sense — which sense is drawn out for all to see in Swedenborg’s expository works. And it was a fascination with those expository works that led to the first creation of a masonic Rite of Swedenborg."

"Swedenborg had an influence upon Freemasonry, albeit unknown to himself...'it was the Freemasons of the advanced degrees who borrowed from Swedenborg, and not Swedenborg from them." Out of the teachings of Swedonborg came the "Swedonborg Rite" or the "Rite of Swedonborg."


 Was Timothy Otis Paine a member of this rite? My guess would be yes. Because Paine was not your average reverend/poet. He was also the LEADING Egyptologist of the day--the "go to" person for deciphering heiroglyphics. Paine was an interesting man. Theologian, archaeologist, Egyptologist, reverend, poet and historian. To say that Timothy Otis Paine was man of mystery would certainly be an understatement. To say that he was accomplished would be a disservice to all that he did. Two of his most interesting accomplishments are his book "Solomon's Temple" and his translation of the Egyptian "Book of The Dead." Two subjects of vital interest to brothers of freemasonry.

"According to Masonic historians, Freemasonry is based on the principles and values of ancient Egypt. The most important principle of the Freemasons that is traced to ancient Egypt is the belief in materialist evolution. This theory of evolution is based on the belief that the universe exists by and of itself, evolving only by chance. In this theory of evolution, matter was always extant, and the world originated when order arose from chaos. This state of chaos was referred to as Nun. A latent, creative force exists within this state of disorder which has the potential to rise above the disorder.

Another philosophical connection established between the ancient Egyptians and the Freemasons is believed to be the common rituals associated with death and burial practices. Specifically, the link between ancient Egypt and the Masons can be found in the text known as The Book of the Dead. This text’s original title is in fact The Book of Coming Forth by Day. It is an ancient Egyptian funerary text that outlines instructions for the afterlife."

Curiously, there is a photo at the West Bridgewater Library of the Solitude Stone. Whoever owned the photo had inscribed in the left-hand corner the name of the locally famous local landmark But curiously the former owner did not write “The Solitude Stone” in firm black ink. Instead the photo was inscribed with the name “The Suicide Stone.” It is unknown how many suicides it took for the Solitude Stone to earn its grisly nickname, but in 1880, a heartbroken young man by the name of John Crane shot himself in the head near it in 1880. " The bridge had “a reputation for suicide.” But at this time I have yet to figure out what suicides happened on the bridge.

In 1970, the West Bridgewater Conservation Commission moved the Solitude Stone to a safer place not far from its original spot during road construction. The old rock Comfort Bridge was dismantled and another bridge was built out of wood not far from the location of the Solitude Stone. The stone is located on Forest Street, on the left, just before the wooden bridge.
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Horror In The Bridgewater Triangle: Is There A Serial Killer Among Us?

 CBS Boston.
Police search the area for more bodies and possible clues.










A dark cloud has cast an evil shadow over the Bridgewater Triangle in the shape of what looks like a local serial killer. The terror started when the remains of two women were found in a heavily wooded area on the Brockton/Abington line on the outskirts of Ames Nowell Park at the end of December. Local papers reported that the women's remains were "stacked" atop one another, the top being the dismembered body of  20-year old Brockton woman, Ashley Mylett. The remains that lie beneath Mylett were identified as a 51-year old Linda Schufedt,  living in nearby Quincy at the time of her disappearance last July. 

This story that sounds like an episode from "Dexter" broke on Sunday December 28th when a local man walking his dog in the woods not far from his house stumbled upon a pile of severed body parts, including a foot, a calf, and an arm. On December 30th, The Brockton Enterprise reported the following:


BA dark cloud has cast an evil shadow over the Bridgewater Triangle in the shape of what looks like a local serial killer. The terror started when the remains of two women were found in a heavily wooded area on the Brockton/Abington line on the outskirts of Ames Nowell Park at the end of December. Local papers reported that the women's remains were "stacked" atop one another, the top being the dismembered body of  20-year old Brockton woman, Ashley Mylett. The remains that lie beneath Mylett were identified as a 51-year old Linda Schufedt,  living in nearby Quincy at the time of her disappearance last July.



This story that sounds like an episode from "Dexter" broke on Sunday December 28th when a local man walking his dog in the woods not far from his house stumbled upon a pile of severed body parts, including a foot, a calf, and an arm. On December 30th, The Brockton Enterprise reported the following:

BROCKTON – A 27-year-old Brockton man was walking through the woods behind his North Quincy Street home Sunday afternoon when he saw something out of place.“I was cutting a path so I can walk the dog and I go hunting out here,” said Peter, who asked that his last name be withheld because of the gruesomeness of the incident. “I saw something pink. I thought it was a dead animal because there’s a lot of poaching back here or maybe insulation because it was pink and lot of people dump trash back here.”What he saw when he looked closer shocked him. It was the dismembered body parts of a woman – a foot, a calf, part of an arm – that were cleanly cut and had appeared to have been put there recently.Officials announced Monday that the gruesome discovery was the remains of two people that had been placed on top of one another. One set of remains had been there significantly longer than the other.Peter walked out into the woods with an Enterprise reporter and photographer Tuesday to where he made the discovery. He showed three photos on his cell phone he took Sunday of some of the body parts. The Enterprise obtained one of the photos and is withholding the image because of its graphic nature.He pointed to a wet part of the ground surrounded by briar patches, downed tree branches and a stone wall about 50 yards away from his backyard Tuesday morning.“When I saw it, I didn’t want to stay around here that long because there was no rot to it. It was all chopped up, you could see the limbs, how nice and neat they were cut,” Peter said. “The guy that put it there put a fold-up chair on it and then put a bunch of wood on it so you can’t see it from the main path.”“All I know is I didn’t want to touch anything. I went in the house and told my sister and I dialed 911,” he said.

Police responded immediately to the scene and began the arduous task of careful excavation of the site, further revealing the skeletal remains of a second body directly underneath the severed body discovered by the man called "Peter" in the article cited.
Acting swiftly, investigators identified the newer remains as 20-year old Ashley Mylett--last seen by her mother around four weeks before--within days; and one week after the discovery of the older skeleton remains, forensic specialists were able to identify the body as belonging to  51-year year old Linda Schufedt, a woman with Brockton ties who had recently moved to nearby Quincy. Schufeldt disappeared last summer, sometime between late June and early July.
Ashley Mylett.

Linda Schufedt.

Even though almost thirty years separated these two woman, both shared a life of living on the outskirts of society and were prone to "disappearing acts," a common denominator the killer surely knew. Both women had a history of substance abuse, particularly heroine. Did these woman become so lost in their addiction that they turned to prostitution? Is that how he got them? Is he a drug dealer, or just someone who hangs around the sections of Brockton where people go to get high looking for people he knows will get into his car with him? Speculate is all we can do right now. I do know that the area where these poor women's bodies were dumped is a place of dark energy, occult worship and mystery with its strange rock walls and chambers. Raccoons and dogs have been found skinned and hung from trees. Another time, a deer was found skinned and dismembered, something Abington police even admit was "odd." Hiking that land with a friend last fall left me sick. I felt horrible, overwhelmingly evil energy there. I felt like like I couldn't breath...like my lungs were being crushed. Even though the area is archaeologically fascinating....I would never go back.  I was horrified to learn of the murders and dumping of these women. And chilled to the bone when I looked at a map of where we hiked last fall and noticed how close we were the spot where these two innocent women who should still be alive today were so carelessly discarded. I wish evil didn't exist. But it does. And right now it could be wearing the mask of the nice guy next door who takes your trash barrels out for you every week. Scary times here in the Bridgewater Triangle.

Related Links:

Brockton killer likely did it before, may do it again, experts say
Human Remains Found In Wooded Area In Brockton
Plymouth DA: Dismembered remains of woman, 20, found in Brockton woods identified
Discovery of human remains has Brockton neighborhood on edge 



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He Moves In Mysterious Ways: The Strange Path of Bigfoot In the Bridgewater Triangle

When I decided to publish a book of Bigfoot reports in the Bridgewater Triangle, I didn't expect to find any surprises. I knew the stories: The Bridgewater "bear" hunt of 1970, when police were deluged with calls of sightings of a seven-foot tall bipedal creature; the Joseph DeAndrade sighting of 1978; the Bigfoot close encounter of John Baker in Hockomock Swamp. And finally, a rash of sightings in the southern area of the Bridgewater Triangle in 2009 investigated by Bigfoot Field Research Organization Investigator, David Brake.

No, I did not expect to find any surprises in compiling my research on the topic of Bigfoot in the Bridgewater Triangle and presenting it in a straight-forward, no frills, information-based report really written for die-hard Bridgewater Triangle buffs. But I did find a surprise. A revelation if you will. And I have to admit, I was excited by my discovery.

When I went to create a map that plotted each location of the encounters cited in my book, I noticed a pattern started to take shape. It was a path! From north to south the sighting locations were almost in a straight line. Here is the first map I created:


"Bam!" I thought, as I put the last point on the map in North Dartmouth. And Kristen was pleased. Then Kristen counted the points on the map she had created and realized that she missed one: The John Baker sighting of 1980 in Hockomock Swamp. The only Bigfoot sighting in the triangle that actually occurred INSIDE of Hockomock Swamp. Kristen was no longer pleased.

Back to the drawing board, I set forth to create a new map. And hoped and that Baker's sighting point would land in the path that had emerged on my map. But I knew it was unlikely. Hockomock Swamp is to the east of the Bridgewater Triangle Bigfoot path, but I still held out hope. I even contacted a family member of Baker's to confirm his location site. I plotted the point then zoomed out on the map. And just as I was afraid of, it fell out of the path to the east. It ruined it, I thought. But did it? Where Baker's was the only sighting to happen in the swamp, his sighting kind of falls out of the pattern, doesn't it?

To see the map with Baker's sighting on it and to learn the details of the Bigfoot reports of the Bridgewater Triangle, check out my book, "Bigfoot in the Bridgewater Triangle: Published Accounts of Sasquatch Encounters in Southeastern Massachusetts, available now digitally through Amazon.
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The Lost Boy of Rehoboth



The swamps of the Bridgewater Triangle have always been regarded as places to be avoided. Children whose homes abutted these dark and dangerous areas were adamantly warned by parents never to venture into the thick and often unsurpassable terrain. Disappearances in the woods and swamps of the Bridgewater Triangle is an area of research I have only recently delved into...and I am shocked at what I am finding: Case after case of disappearances, most of them children, who disappeared right on or near their family homesteads. Most of these stories I have yet to fully investigate, so at this time I can't report if these cases were ever solved, if the children were ever found. Other cases involve adults who went into missing in the woods and were found, but their memories of what happened are murky or non-existent.
This story I am about to tell is one of the most interesting I have come across in my research: The story of the disappearance (and bizarre REAPPEARANCE) of a Rehoboth boy who disappeared from his family farm while playing with his sister.
4 1/2-year old Alden Johnson's screams were heard by neighbors, who interpreted the cries as being made by a child in a pain. One witness thought a child had been struck by a car; another suggested it sounded like a child was snatched by kidnapper.

The search began immediately. The area was combed in a two-mile radius around the homestead. "Ponds had been dynamited and pumped out. There was a ray of hope when nothing was found there. Houses and barns had been searched. The possibility of kidnapping or that he been carried off by a hit and run driver was considered and ruled out. There remained only the woods, and experienced woodsmen and State police had search them.”
Twenty-four hours later, the boy's family and searchers began to fear the worst: That "Young Aldie" was dead in the woods, having perished from exposure. The night before had brought a storm to the area and the temperatures had teetered around freezing, pounding the area with freezing rain. The search for the boy was the biggest and most extensive search for any lost person to date at the time. Night was close to falling again on that cold March evening when local C.C.C. (Civil Conservation Corps) members, working in nearby swamp two miles away from where Aldie disappeared, decided to take matters into their own hands. They were packing up to leave their camp and head to their next assignment in Foxboro when the idea came to them. They had just starting searching the swamp when out of nowhere, the little boy appeared and casually walked up to one of the men. The boy looked very happy and not lost at all. Aldie smiled, held up a bundle of twigs and asked the C.C.C. worker if he wanted to buy some flowers. The Civil Conservation Corps worker said of the state that the boy was in when he found him,  "He seemed to be in a daze, but he was smart. He said, “Wanta buy some flowers? And he held out what he had--sprigs and limbs of shrub growth in his hand.I said sure and he seemed delighted." The worker yelled out, "I found him!" And the men all cheered.
"Young Aldie was asked if he had been afraid. He hadn’t been. He had just been picking flowers, he explained, and he could sell them….He was still trying to sell the shrubs and twigs for which he started out on an expedition that brought about the greatest mobilization in searches in the State’s recent history."

Safe with his parents, the boy reported remembering nothing. He didn't seem to know where he was or that any time had gone by since he disappeared. Or what had made him scream so frightfully. All that the little boy remembered was that suddenly he was compelled to leave his sister and go into the woods to pick some flowers. And that if he did that he could sell those flowers and could be rich. When he looked at his twigs, he still saw flowers. He never felt the cold, the rain, had no memory of seeing the C.C.C. workers bonfire which had been going all night...in a swamp that is only known today for one thing: The home of Anawan Rock.

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Freetown Forest: Unidentified Floating Objects Descend From The Sky In 1942

"None of the witnesses saw any "human forms," and one witness suggested perhaps it was parts of a plane that fell to the ground. But no plane parts were found. "None of the citizens reporting to police were certain that the objects floating down were human, but they were certain that "something" had descended over the Freetown and Assonet areas."

What fell from the skies over Freetown Forest on the night of November 4, 1942? I don't know. And neither did the witnesses who saw the "objects" descending from the sky and down into the forest that night, nor did the police who investigated the incident. After receiving four separate reports that night from nervous citizens who witnessed the event, police took the indent very seriously. 

Some witness described the objects as looking like parachutes. And why wouldn't they? It was the dawn of World War II and anything suspicious would certainly be percieved as relating to the war. It isn't unlikely that those scared citizens believed the Germans had started their invasion of Bristol County!

None of the witnesses saw any "human forms," and one witness suggested perhaps it was parts of a plane that fell to the ground. But no plane parts were found. "None of the citizens reporting to police were certain that the objects floating down were human, but they were certain that "something" had descended over the Freetown and Assonet areas."

Sargent Michael Ryan was on duty on Brightman Bridge in Fall River that night, when he was approached by two separate individuals, at two different times. The two witnesses' stories were almost identical. Patrolman Michael Hart was stationed at the other side of town when someone approached him with the same story. By the time an anonymous call came into the station, police were already on alert. 

Authorites searched the woods and found nothing. They contacted the Army who assured them they were not involved in the incident in any way. The mystery was never solved. It is just another page in the open book of the Bridgewater Triangle.

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The Red Headed Hitchhiker: The Four Stories That Made Him Infamous & And the Author Behind the Legend


Ask anyone familiar with the Bridgewater Triangle, "Who is the most famous resident ghost?" and they'll tell you: It's "The Red Headed Hitchhiker of Route 44. This menacing, disheveled-looking phantom, dressed in a red plaid shirt with a messy red beard and crazy hair is said to haunt a five-mile stretch of road at the beginning of 38-mile long route 44. The legend of "The Red Headed Hitchhiker" was first laid out by Rehoboth historian, anthropologist, and archaeologist, Charles Turek Robinson in his 1994 classic, "The New England Ghost Files: An Authentic Compendium of Frightening Phantoms." Robinson called the hitchhiker  "The Red-Headed Phantom of Route 44" and labeled the legends of this maniacal, horrific spirit,  "Ghost File #7." Robinson includes 57 "Ghost Files" in his book, although he collected close to 200 first hand accounts of run-ins with ghosts in his research for this work. Robinson meticulously interviewed each witness three times, as to ensure their authenticity.

Five different local residents came forward to Robinson with similar accounts about a strange man sighted on the dark leg of route 44 that connects Seekonk with Rehoboth. In each of the accounts, the red-headed man looks 100% real, but never speaks, his countenance and blank, his eyes are empty, yet he smiles eerily. And often laughs frantically.

The first witness of "Ghost File #7" is a man Robinson calls, "Joe." Joe reported:  "I saw a man's face outside the car, pressed against the passenger-side window. This was physically impossible...my car was traveling about fifty miles an hour. The face was looking in at me, grinning. I could see that the man had red hair and was wearing a red plaid shirt. I swerved off the highway and brought my car to a stop. But that time, the man had vanished. After about ten minutes I finally calmed down enough to restart my car and drive home. That incident has left me shaken up for the past twenty-five years." Joe's encounter took place in the winter of 1969.


Robinson calls the next witness, "Fred Durpis." One summer night at around 10 o'clock back in 1973, "Fred" saw the "hitchhiker." Fred pulled over to give him a lift and saw the man running toward his truck in his rear-view mirror. The "man" climbed in and Fred asked him where he was headed. The man just sat there in silence, smiling. Again, Fred asked, "Where are you going?" The man just sat there in the cab of the truck, smiling. That was enough for "Fred." He pulled the truck over and ordered the man out. The hitchhiker complied. But instead of opening truck door, he simply disappeared.  "He just stared to get very hazy until I could behind to see through him."

The next tale Robinson tells is of a woman who named "Barbara" who encountered the phantom in February of 1981. The woman was driving along route 44--going about sixty miles per hour--when suddenly she hit a man fitting the description of the infamous hitchhiker: Red hair, red plaid shirt. Only when she hit the man, her car drove right through him.

"There was no time to brake or even swerve the car. In a matter of seconds I ran him over. I mean, I thought I had." Barbara stopped the car, thinking she had just killed someone. Only, no one was there. Walking back to her car after thoroughly checking the road, the woman heard something that chilled her to the bone.

"I heard this loud, horrible laughter coming from the woods to the side of the road, right near the spot where thought I hit the man...The laughter was terrible." She got into her car and drove away, stunned. To her horror, after driving down route 44 not even a mile, there was the man again in the middle of the road and again she drove right through him. Again she stopped the car, but this time she did not get out, only rolled down the car window. Again, she heard the laughter. At that point the woman booked it out of there.

The last story in Robinson's chapter on "Ghost File #7" is about a Swansea couple he calls "Harry and Sheena Hanson." Harry and Sheena were driving route 44 in October of 1984 when their car broke down. Harry told Sheena to stay in the car, while he tried to find a pay phone to call AAA road service. The man makes his way down the dark road when he spots what he describes as a "sloppy looking guy with red messy hair" sitting on the side of the road.

The man asked the stranger if he knew where the closest pay phone is. The stranger didn't answer. The man asked him again. The messy red-haired man only sat in silence staring at him. So the man asked again. And again. And there was silence. One more time the man asked and now he notices what he describes as an "odd grin" upon the stranger's face. The man asked the stranger if he is okay. Upon posing the question, the stranger's face changed. The man described  the eerie nighttime encounter with the "hitchhiker" this way: “Suddenly, the man’s face got very strange. He stopped grinning, he twisted his mouth and I noticed that there was something wrong with his eyes. They were all clouded over--no pupils or anything. Just blank and all white. I began to feel weird and started to walk away from him. As I hurried away, I heard the man laughing. I turned around, but he was no longer there. I mean, I could no longer see him there, but I still heard the laughing. It was coming from just a few feet away from me. And the laughing kept switching locations. First in front of me, then behind me, then to the left of me. It was bizarre."

The man ran back to the car in fright only to find his wife standing outside of it, visibly terrified. She tells her husband that after he left she had turned on the car radio and was listening to a song when to her horror suddenly the song wasn't coming out of the radio anymore: A very creepy man's voice came out of the car's speakers instead. The voice taunted her, called her by name, all the while laughing hysterically.

"Is it just the spread of local folklore that accounts for so many separate reports involving the same alleged phantom? The skeptics among us might say so, though it should be noted that the witnesses interviewed by the author were intelligent, non-superstitious people who related their accounts sincerely, consistently, and credibly. In all cases, they had clearly been affected by their very strange experiences," Robinson states in "Ghost Files."


Charles Turek Robinson at Village Cemetery, Rehoboth. Copyright Taunton Gazette. For full article, click here. 

Robinson--a Harvard educated anthropologist, archaeologist, and writer--was thrown into the world of tracking and recording local ghost stories quite by accident, after running an article one Halloween featuring the work of one of the country's first ghost hunters, Hans Holtzer. In his research, a story about a poltergeist in his hometown of Rehoboth emerged. Soon after the article was published, Robinson's editor started receiving letters addressed to " Charles Turek Robinson" from locals, eager to relay their own accounts of supernatural activity. And the father of a legend was born. In an interview in the May, 2002 edition of "Cyril Magazine," Robinson revealed: "Many of the accounts that were related to me by readers were silly and contained many of the usual stereotypes....I rejected those. However, there were a few that were very provocative in their originality. They did not contain the usual stereotypes and sensationalism. They contained elements so unusual and so original that if these people hadn't really had these experiences, they should have been writing or telescripting in Hollywood."

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